Archive for the ‘banks’ Category

Bank Regulation Follies

The latest fad in bank regulation folly is to assert that much higher capital levels are the solution to the problem that was supposedly solved by Dodd-Frank. Amar Bhide provides a nice rejoinder to the fantasy that all we have to do is make banks hold more capital: Yet focusing mainly on how much banks [...]

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Speeding Up Foreclosures

An interesting take on recent foreclosure activity from Diana Olick: As regulators and law enforcers battle this out, banks are ramping up foreclosures with increasing speed. A new report from ForeclosureRadar, which measures some of the most distressed markets out West, shows a big jump in March foreclosure sales, the final stage of foreclosure. Total [...]

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Is Countrywide Heading Towards A BK

Here’s an interesting scenario that Credit Agricole’s analyst, Mike Mayo, paints. He suggests that Bank of America might find a Countrywide bankruptcy the best alternative if things in the mortgage world continue to deteriorate. From the WSJ’s Deal Journal, here is his reasoning: 1) The legal reason: Countrywide is a separate legal entity from BofA, [...]

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Steve Jobs As A Ninja And Other Thoughts

Not much time to post this past week, so here are some things that caught my eye along the way. Housing The emerging consensus seems to be that while the government can keep shooting bullets at the housing market for as long as they care to throw away tax payer dollars, their efforts are likely [...]

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Basel lll – Hype And Reality

If you’re a sentient being then by now you are most likely near serious contemplation of self-destruction at the mere mention of the words Basel lll. Therefore, I will keep this mercifully short. First, if you somehow missed the news, the Cliff Notes version is that new international capital standards for banks have been agreed [...]

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Small Banks And TARP: A Train Wreck

In the scheme of things it’s a bit trifling but this month’s report from the Congressional Oversight Committee charged with reviewing the execution of TARP and other facets of the financial services rescue is an object lesson in what can and may have gone wrong with the program. It deals with the plight of small [...]

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